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How to Recognize Sensitive Situations

Written by Lynn Gaertner-Johnston, Syntax Training

Sometimes you can recognize instantly that a message will lead to trouble. When you are angry or upset, you know better than to bang out a hostile email. But some sticky circumstances may not be obvious. Ask yourself these 10 questions to recognize potential problems. If you answer yes to any question, think twice or get advice before communicating in email.

office, communication, how to, learn English1. Could this be someone else’s news to share?

In your excitement about good news, you may want to broadcast the information quickly. Maybe your company has won the contract, grant, or lawsuit. Maybe the amazing candidate has accepted the job offer. But before you email the news, ask yourself whether it is YOUR news or someone else’s to share. Sharing news that is not yours can deflate other people’s pride and excitement. It can even suggest that you were responsible for the accomplishment. On the job, don’t think of yourself as a newscaster, sharing updates whenever they happen. Let the good news come from those who own it.

blogger first news

2. Do certain people need to learn this news before others? 

People who will be most affected by news should receive it first. For instance, if several internal candidates apply for a position, the applicants should learn which one of them got the job before everyone in the company finds out. If a team will move to another city, the people on the team need the information before the entire company requires it. Informing people in advance shows them respect, and it eliminates the embarrassment of their not knowing before others do. Avoid needless problems by thinking about your various audiences before sending one all-company message.

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3. Could including others on the Cc line hurt someone’s feelings, relationships, or reputation?

It is easy to get in the habit of Ccing the team or replying to all to keep everyone informed. But everyone should NOT be informed when there is any chance that the information will embarrass or harm others. Tasks such as communicating constructive feedback, denying a request, disagreeing—even sending a straightforward reminder to someone who has missed a deadline—can create embarrassment and bad feelings when other people get a copy of the email. In these situations, do not Cc or reply to all. Communicate privately with the individual involved.

man-discomfort

4. Do I have feelings of discomfort about sending this message? Is there a small voice warning me not to do this?

When you have any doubts about sending an email, listen to them. Doubts and feelings of discomfort are huge signs of likely insensitive communication. Maybe the solution is to wait, not communicate, or ask your manager or your human resources representative for help. It is better to delay communicating than to have to heal a strained relationship or apologize for a serious blunder.

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5. Might my manager, my human resources rep, or another professional have advice for me to consider?

You may know that you need to communicate, and there is no small voice telling you not to. Yet other people may be able to help you express yourself more diplomatically or appropriately. When you suspect that your email will fall short and may damage relationships, seek advice from a trusted guide. The advice may be to call or meet in person rather than emailing.

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6. Would a face-to-face or phone conversation manage this situation more effectively? 

Sometimes email does not work because it is just crisp words on a screen, not the voice of a human being in conversation. Situations in which email may be insensitive are communicating bad news, denying a request, apologizing, and giving performance feedback. Email isn’t always wrong in these circumstances, but it can be.

bad timing

7. Could the timing of this communication be unfortunate for any reason? 

Sometimes a message is right but the timing is wrong. Maybe the timing affects one individual badly, or maybe a whole group will rebel if they receive such a message now. If an employee has just shared with you that his spouse is ill, for instance, he will not welcome a message saying overtime is required until the project is completed. If a team is preparing for a huge implementation, learning that the leader has given two weeks’ notice may cause an uproar. Such delicate situations don’t require that you hide the news but that you communicate it sensitively—maybe individually, maybe in a group meeting—and allow two-way communication.

all information info

8. Is it possible that I do not have all the information to understand this situation?

Assumptions and Incomplete information damage workplace communication every day. You may think that someone is ignoring your email, when you are using an incorrect address. A delay may suggest to you that your boss has rejected your proposal, when she is really taking time to gain approval for it. Do not send email inspired by assumptions, or you risk creating a problem unnecessarily.

private inappropriate

9. Could this topic be inappropriate for a workplace communication? 

In most workplaces, religion, race, politics, sex, sexual orientation, and physical appearance are off-limits as topics in written messages. Words, cartoons, and other images on these topics will be hurtful to some people, which is the reason workplaces prohibit them. It is not acceptable to send a message on these topics to even one person because of the necessity of keeping the workplace safe and welcoming for everyone.

company business

10. Could anything about this communication make my company look bad? 

Your unstated purpose in every communication is to present your organization as positively as possible. Imagine your email featured on a six o’clock evening news program. Would it make your company look like a good corporate citizen and employer? Or could it lead to scandal and embarrassment? If anything about the message might present the organization in a negative light, talk to your human resources and legal departments before moving forward.

© Syntax Training. All rights reserved.
 
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How to Ask a Stranger for a Favor

Written by Lynn Gaertner-Johnston, Syntax Training
business-English learn correspondence, how to write email
I regularly receive email from strangers who would like answers to their writing questions or help with their writing. Some of the messages, like this one, annoy me: 

Send me the tips for taking effective minutes at meetings. Thanks.
As you can see, that message includes no greeting, no introduction, no close, no name, and no identifying information. 

The following message is just the opposite: 

Read More…

9 Novel English neologisms

[nurd]

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The slang term nerd means an intelligent but single-minded person, obsessed with a certain hobby or pursuit, e.g. a computer nerd. But the word that has been the bane of so many elementary schoolers’ existence was actually invented by their king: none other than Dr. Seuss himself! The word first appeared in print in Seuss’ 1950 picture book, If I Ran the Zoo, though Seuss’ “nerd” is a small animal from the land of Ka-Troo, not a pale kid with glasses taped together.

Yahoo

[yah-hoo, yey-, yah-hoo]

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The origin of this word may add some unexpected irony to the well-known internet browser. Originally coined by Jonathan Swift in his 1726 novel Gulliver’s Travels, Yahoo refers to the brutish race of homo sapiens ruled by the Houyhnhnm, a noble race of speaking horses. Swift’s Yahoos display all of the vices of humanity with none of the virtues, thus it makes sense that the word has come to mean “a coarse or brutish person.” If you say “yahoo” loud enough you might be moved to experience our next neologism.

Chortle

[chawr-tl]

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Lewis Carroll coined this funny term for a gleeful chuckle in his 1872 novel, Through the Looking Glass, the sequel to Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. In the novel, the word appears in a verse poem titled “The Jabberwocky,” in which Alice finds a book that can only be read using a mirror. The old man in the poem “chortles in his joy” when his son beheads the terrible monster. Today the word is widely thought to be a combination of “chuckle” and “snort.”

Quark

[kwawrk, kwahrk]

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A quark can be any group of elementary particles that combine to become a subatomic particle such a neutron or proton. In other words, quarks are some of the smallest building blocks of an atom. In 1964 the U.S. physicist Murray Gell-Mann named the particle after a word he found in James Joyce’s novel, Finnegan’s Wake. Joyce’s quotation reads, “Three quarks for Muster Mark,” with “quark” referring to the cry of the seagull.

Utopia

[yoo-toh-pee-uh]

utopia

Utopia is the title of Sir Thomas More’s whimsical and satirical book written in 1516. More envisions a perfect society situated on an island that he names Utopia. Developing the word from the Greek topos for “place,” More chose the prefix ou- or u- meaning “not” or “no.” Thus the name Utopia quite literally means no place at all. Even though More might have his reservations about the achievability of a perfect world, our next neologism might be the closest thing to a perfect sound.

Tintinnabulation

[tin-ti-nab-yuhley-shuhn]

learn English

The American poet and author Edgar Allen Poe coined this onomatopoetic word in his 1849 poem “The Bells.” The poem was published shortly after Poe’s death, and though the four sections of the piece become progressively darker as Poe describes four different types of bells, tintinnabulation characterizes the joyous sound of silver sleigh bells, foretelling “a world of merriment.” The word is derived from the Latin tinnire meaning “to ring” combined with the instrumental suffix “bulum.”

Grok

[grok]

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Do you feel like nobody groks you? Don’t worry, Robert A. Heinlein does. In his 1961 best-selling science fiction novel, Stranger in a Strange Land, Heinlein coined the term to mean an understanding so thorough that “the observer becomes a part of the observed–to merge, blend, intermarry, lose identity in group experience.” But in common usage the term means to communicate sympathetically or to “drink in” understanding. If you’re reading this slideshow off a screen, you’ll definitely grok our next neologism.

Cyberspace

[sahy-ber-speys]

syberspace

Though you might not want to build a house there, anyone with a computer has a stake in cyberspace. Coined by the science fiction writer William Gibson, cyberspace first appeared in a 1982 short story. The word combines the terms “cybernetics” (the use of mechanical and electronic systems to replace human function) and “space” (an area or realm). Together they form “cyberspace,” the realm of electronic communication or virtual reality. If you’ve ever thought “virtual reality” was a bit of an oxymoron, you might be familiar with our final neologism.

Catch-22

[kach-twen-tee-too]

catch 22

The deal sounds great, but what’s the catch?” Have you heard something like this? Then you’d better hope the catch isn’t a Catch-22. The phrase represents a frustrating situation in which one is trapped by contradictory regulations or conditions. Catch-22 is the title and central problem of Joseph Heller’s 1961 novel, and in Heller’s context the catch represents a simultaneously dangerous and idiotic military regulation that maddens the poor characters tangled in his Catch-22.
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5 Weird Things About Writing That Actually Work

by KAMAL SUCHARAN BURRI

 Being a filmmaker and writer, I’ve discovered some ridiculous but enlightening tips that increase the potential of a writer. I was totally astonished by the fact that they worked for me.

1. Use a notepad for drafting, rather than a notebooknotebook

I’ve just noticed this a few days back. I have the habit of writing scripts in notebooks and sometimes in separate pages. One day I went to the bookshop and accidentally purchased the “NOTEPAD”, the one where you flip off pages vertically. I started writing on it; to my bewilderment the writing flow of mine was awesome. It might be due to fewer distractions from the previous page as I obviously flip off to the new page every time. I don’t know why, but trust me, it works. Read More…

50 Best Blogs for the Public Relations Major

News

Follow news in the world of PR with these blogs.

  1. PR Week: Check out PR Week for PR and communications news, as well as opinion, research, jobs, and events. (Recommended Post: Investment in Social Media Set to Increase Over Next Year)
  2. Everything PR: Stay on top of public relations news with Everything PR, a public relations news portal blog. (Recommended Post: 100 Media Monitoring Tools for PR)
  3. PR News: PR News will help you become a smart communicator with media relations, PR jobs, industry events, news, and much more. (Recommended Post: Do Something Different: Engage the Media Using Twitter)
  4. PRBlogNews: Find subjective public relations news and commentary on PRBlogNews.com. (Recommended Post: Useless Knowledge)
  5. O’Dwyers: On this New York-based blog, you’ll find insider news in public relations and marketing communications. (Recommended Post: Cooking PR Chile)
  6. PRSA Newsroom: Follow this blog from the Public Relations Society of America for awards, advocacy news, events, and more. (Recommended Post: PRSA Speaks Out on “Pay for Play”)

Public Relations

Follow these blogs to get a general look at public relations.

  1. Online Public Relations Thoughts: Read this blog to find daily thoughts on PR and trends in communication online. James Horton, the blog’s author, received three degrees, from UCLA, University of Missouri, and a university in Evanston, Illinois. (Recommended Post: Anger and Ignorance)
  2. PR in Your Pajamas: Find practical publicity ideas for entrepreneurs on PR in Your Pajamas. (Recommended Post: 15 Types of Stories That Get You Free Publicity)
  3. Tech PR Nibbles: Tech PR Nibbles features small insights and ideas for conversations, influences, and even bigger ideas. (Recommended Post: The Digital Miscommunicator)
  4. Skogrand PR Solutions Blog: Find solutions, tips, and insights on public relations, social media, and more on the Skogrand PR Solutions blog. (Recommended Post: An easy way to keep clients: surveys)
  5. Beyond the Hype: Lois Paul’s blog takes high tech PR beyond the hype and into reality. Paul writes from Boston, MA. (Recommended Post: Rebuilding Your Reputation by Digging a Deeper Hole)
  6. PR Couture: Read PR Couture for reflections and news in fashion PR. (Recommended Post: Fashion PR With an Editor’s Touch)
  7. The Flack: Follow Peter Himler’s blog to see the role public relations plays in politics, finance, technology, and more. (Recommended Post: Long Live PR (and the Press Release Too))
  8. Public Relations Blogger: On this blog, you’ll find resources for PR, social media, media relations, and more. The blog is authored by Ashley Wirthlin, a marketing associate and graduate of the University of Portland in Oregon. (Recommended Post: 4 Reasons Public Relations (Not Advertising) Builds a Brand)
  9. Drew B’s Take on Tech PR: See what Drew has to say about his work as a managing director at a tech PR agency. (Recommended Post: How Digital PR is Changing)
  10. Solor PR Pro: This blog is great for PR students who want to learn how to become a successful freelance PR consultant. (Recommended Post: Why You Need an Online Home Base — and How to Get One)
  11. Prowl Public Relations: Read Temple University’s student-run PR firm blog for PR strategies and knowledge beyond the classroom. (Recommended Post: Fighting the Dark Side of Social Media)
  12. PR Breakfast Club: Start your day off right with this PR blog for fresh PR news, education, and insight. (Recommended Post: Defending the PR Profession)
  13. Think: Temple University’s American Marketing Association shares this blog to get you thinking about PR. (Recommended Post: PR/Marketing/Events Internship)

Media & Communications

Check out these blogs for a guide to marketing, media, communications, and more.

  1. PR Meets Marketing: Find out about the application of PR and marketing on PR Meets Marketing. (Recommended Post: Beware of “Speeds and Feeds” PR)
  2. PR for Thought Leaders: This blog shares insight for B2B marketing and public relations. (Recommended Post: The Huge Mistake We All Make)
  3. COMMS corner: COMMS corner is the home of people-shaped communities. (Recommended Post: The Don Draper Guide to Social Media Marketing)
  4. Jeff Esposito: Jeff Esposito explores conversational media on this blog, and shares how you can win the race in communications and community building. (Recommended Post: Measuring Social Media and the Value of Information)
  5. Media Bullseye: On the Media Bullseye blog, you’ll find thoughts for communicating more with less. (Recommended Post: Ragu, Dads, and Lessons Learned for Communicators and Bloggers)
  6. Holtz Communication + Technology: Check out this blog to learn about communicating at the intersection of business and technology. (Recommended Post: It’s Not About You)
  7. Brian Solis: Follow Brian Solis’ blog to see the convergence of media and influence. (Recommended Post: The Rise of Social Commerce)
  8. Journalistics: In this blog, you’ll learn about topics at the intersection of public relations and journalism. (Recommended Post: A Look at How People Share Content on the Web)
  9. Media Relations Blog: Media Relations is dedicated to the world of media, public relations, and marketing. (Recommended Post: Beginner’s Guide to SEO for Optimized PR)
  10. Strategic Public Relations: Find strategy for integrated marketing communications on this blog. (Recommended Post: What Would Jesus Twitter?)

Social Media

Social media is one of the biggest things happening in PR these days, and these blogs offer great guidance for staying in touch via social media.

  1. PR 2.0: Deirdre Breakenridge offers strategies for new media, tools, and audiences on PR 2.0. (Recommended Post: PR 2.0 Checklist)
  2. Liberate Media: This online PR and social media agency has insight for online and offline expertise in PR. (Recommended Post: Crowdsourcing Compendium)
  3. Karen’s PR & Social Media Blog: Karen’s blog features reputation management, social media, and crisis communication, (Recommended Post: PR & Reputation Insurance for Clients)
  4. Peter Shankman: Peter Shankman’s blog is all about advice for social media and business from a guy who’s been there. (Recommended Post: Be Careful What You Post)
  5. 360 Digital Influence: On this blog, you’ll find fresh influences in social media and word of mouth marketing. (Recommended Post: How Hospitals are Quietly Leading the Way with Social Media)
  6. PR-Squared: On PR-Squared, read about the next big things that are already here with conversations in social media and marketing. (Recommended Post: Social Media Abhors a Vacuum)
  7. Social Realist: Check out Social Realist for social media without stupidity. (Recommended Post: A Few Words for Social Media Cyberbullies)

PR Professionals

On these blogs, you can read about PR from professionals who do it every day.

  1. Cathy Hrudicka & Associates: Cathy Hrudicka offers her advice and guidance as a PR, social media, and marketing mentor on this blog. (Recommended Post: An Unrelenting Passion to Make the World Better)
  2. WiredPRWorks: Barbara Rozgonyi offers inspiration in direct, digital, and dynamic marketing and PR on her blog. (Recommended Post: Most Powerful Twitter Women at the Moment)
  3. Voce Communications: Voce shares great ideas for building brand awareness and more on this blog. (Recommended Post: Understanding the Big and Small of Social Media Measurement)
  4. 360 Days in Our Circle: Follow this PR group to see what it’s really like to work in the world of public relations. (Recommended Post: How to Create a Viral Video)
  5. BiteMarks: BiteMarks takes a fearless look at global communications. (Recommended Post: Real-time Marketing)
  6. Communiqué PR: Communiqué PR offers insight into the life of a strategic public relations firm on this blog. (Recommended Post: Coca-Cola Fan Page Takes Facebook by Storm)
  7. A PR Guy’s Musings: Stuart Bruce shares his musings on public relations, corporate communications, and social media. (Recommended Post: An Inconvenient PR Truth)
  8. POP! PR Jots: This blog offers regular commentary on PR, publicity, and related topics in starting a public relations firm. (Recommended Post: I Don’t Do SXSWi)
  9. PerkettPRsuasion: Get a look into integrated PR, social marketing, and digital content on PerkettPR’s blog. (Recommended Post: The Art of Listening in Client Service)
  10. Next Communications: Riche Escovedo writes about conversations and communities in school communications and beyond on this blog. (Recommended Post: PR People Can Measure Social Media. We Just Need to Learn.)
  11. Dave Fleet: Follow Dave Fleet’s blog for a look at communications, social media, and PR. (Recommended Post: 8 Questions to Ask Your “Social Media Expert”)
  12. StevenSilvers: Read Steven Silvers’ field notes on PR and strategic influence on this blog. (Recommended Post: Five Things All PR Students Should Know About Their Choice of Career)
  13. prTini: Heather Whaling blogs about collaboration, integration, and social good on prTini. (Recommended Post: Say Hello: Beyond Social Media Cliques)
  14. Bloomacious: Carrie Leber’s blog features PR, event planning, and publicity, with the occasional style and craft feature. (Recommended Post: Desperate Housewives Set Style)

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Lost in translation…you failed at grasping English

As most adventurous travellers know, when exploring the far and remote corners of the world, it can be difficult to communicate clearly.

Try as we might to understand the local rhetoric and interact effectively, there’s still something to be said for those hilarious moments of misunderstanding.

One of the instances most easy (and most fun) to misinterpret?

Signage gone wrong.

Doug Lansky has collected the best signage fails from his travels around the world for Lonely Planet’s latest book. Pictured: a hotel sign points out the obvious in Austin, Texas

Although the prices are unclear, a Beijing cafe’s tasteless coffee option seems far less appetising

In Essex, England, this sign doesn’t do a very good job of keeping this top-secret location under wraps

And that is the topic of Lonely Planet’s latest book: Ultimate Signspotting: Absurd And Amusing Signs From Around The World.

For those who enjoy living life on the edge, this sign in Suzhou, China, is made for you

This sign in Rome, Georgia, has us asking: how much do new rainbows go for?

It’s clear from this Ambridge, Pennsylvania sign that Reverend John Ritter is one very content fellow

‘That is, new hilarious signs are going up all the time. At times, it seems like a race between the people who put up these ridiculous signs and those who try to photograph them.

‘Over the last 20 years, I’ve gathered well over 50,000 sign photos from well-travelled amateur and professional photographers.

‘Trying to decide which is unintentially funny enough to merit inclusion in a Signspotting book has been a challenge.

‘Trying to select favourites among those for this ‘ultimate collection’ has been downright unnerving.’

In Maui, Hawaii, the definition of the word ‘bottomless’ clearly means 65 feet

Slippery pedestrians are a problem when it rains, according to this grammar fail in San Francisco, California

A local dental clinic in Taipei, Taiwan sure doesn’t do much to assure nervous patients

In Dublin, Ireland, drivers are encouraged never to settle for second best

Ironically, the view of this New Hampshire sign is anything but clear

Commuters in Camebridge, Massachusetts, are warned of some major delays with this hilarious sign

Ears too floppy? Nose too long? According to this sign in Jaipur, India, there are people here to help

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100 Best Blogs for Journalism Students

With newspapers going under all over the nation, journalism is becoming an increasingly hard field in which to start a career as the number of opportunities in traditional media are rapidly dwindling. Journalism students shouldn’t despair just yet, however, as the web and other digital outlets are offering a host of new opportunities that may help fill the gaps left by the loss of many local papers and print magazines. Yet while new opportunities may be on the horizon for web-savvy journalists, that doesn’t mean that journalism has become any less competitive and to make it into a solid job, students will need to know more than just how to write well.

One way to get a leg up is by studying the trends, technologies, and intricacies of the modern world of journalism, a goal which is most easily accomplished by becoming an avid reader of journalism blogs. We’ve collected a few here that we think are essential reads for journalism students, an update on our original list from 2009, which includes some new names and faces as well as some perennial favorites that we think journalism students shouldn’t miss out on following.

General

Read up on journalism basics through the insights offered on these blogs.

  1. Poynter.: This organization’s blog is home to great news on all things journalism and media.
  2. Common Sense Journalism: Doug Fisher, broadcaster, newspaper reporter, and Senior Instructor at the University of South Carolina in Columbia, South Carolina, shares his thoughts on new media and traditional media alike on this site.
  3. Data Journalism Blog: Educate yourself on data-driven journalism when you check out this regularly updated, infographic-heavy blog.
  4. About.com Journalism: This blog is a great place to learn about everything from AP style to finding a job after graduation.
  5. journajunkie: Here, readers can find articles on a wide scope of journalism-related topics.
  6. Journalistics: Authored by Georgia-based blogger Jeremy Porter, this journalism blog focuses on social media, PR, media relations, and other modern issues in the profession.
  7. Covering Health: Health care is a big issue these days and this blog from the Association of Health Care Journalists offers tips and insights into covering it.
  8. MediaBistro: Read news about media issues, find tips, and even get job leads from this great blog.
  9. The Evolving Newsroom: Julie Starr shares her thoughts on the news business and newsrooms around the U.S. on this blog.

News

Read news about the news, or at least the people who report it, through these excellent blogs.

  1. Journalism.org: Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism shares data, analysis, news, and reports through this must-read blog.
  2. Editor & Publisher: Keep up with all the latest news about newspapers and digital publications around the world by following this blog, which is based in Irvine, CA.
  3. sans serif: Don’t limit your reading to only American topics. On this blog, you’ll learn about journalism in India, from who’s who to what’s working for papers.
  4. newsguild.org: Newspaper Guild and Communications Workers of America can find relevant news stories of interest through this blog.
  5. Media Guardian: Read up on media from across the pond in this Guardian-penned blog filled with the latest news.
  6. Adweek: This blog makes it simple to keep up with news in the press, television, technology, and advertising.
  7. Newspaper Death Watch: Sadly, newspapers are slowly dying out all over the U.S. Learn more about which ones have fallen on this somewhat macabre blog.
  8. Topix Journalism News: This aggregate blog brings together journalism stories from thousands of different sites.
  9. I Want Media: Read up on all the latest media news, from papers to movies, on this simple media-focused blog.
  10. Newspaper and Online News: The Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, headquartered in South Carolina, maintains this blog, full of information not only about the organization but journalism as a whole.
  11. Alltop Journalism News: This blog aggregates journalism news from all over the web, bringing it together in one accessible place.

Academia

Hear from students, professors, and experts on journalism on this diverse collection of blogs.

  1. Bob Stepno’s Other Journalism: Professor Bob Stepno shares his thoughts with former Radford University Virginia students, colleagues, and the public on this blog.
  2. Jay Rosen’s Press Think: Jay Rosen, a journalism professor at NYU in New York, offers up commentary on all things journalism (especially its struggle to survive in our digital world) on this site.
  3. Columbia Journalism Review: Head to this blog for a look at the world of journalism from all sides, courtesy of the students, professors, and professionals at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism in New York City.
  4. Teaching Online Journalism: The web plays a key role in journalism these days, something you can learn more about from Professor Mindy McAdams via this blog.
  5. Nieman Journalism Lab: The Nieman Foundation at Harvard maintains this blog, full of journalism ideas, media updates, and more.
  6. Campfire Journalism: Professor Mark Berkey-Gerard teaches online and multimedia journalism courses at Rowan University, but even those not enrolled in his classes can take advantage of his expertise through this blog.
  7. andydickinson.net: Here you’ll find professor Andy Dickinson, an expert in digital and online journalism, talking about all kinds of digital media.
  8. JACC Blog: Read through this blog to learn about the present and future of journalism education at American community colleges.
  9. Innovation in College Media:This organization’s blog discusses some of the most pressing issues in college media, from content to design and everything in between.
  10. The Online Journalism Review:The Knight Digital Media Center, USC, and UC Berkeley in California all contribute to make this blog an informative place for any students or journalists looking to learn more about digital journalism.
  11. Jschool Student Blog: Students in journalism school in Australia team up to write great posts on life as students on this blog.
  12. CommPilings: The Annenberg School for Communication’s library shares resources, news, and alerts here.
  13. KDMC Blog: This site is the official blog of the Knight Digital Media Center, a great place for students to learn more about working with new media in journalism.
  14. University of Vermont Journalism Blog: Highlighting students and faculty, this Vermont university blog can give you a peek into life as a journalism student.
  15. BuzzMachine: Jeff Jarvis, an associate professor of journalism at CUNY, shares posts on everything from journalism education to new media and technology.
  16. Charlie Beckett: Charlie Beckett blogs for the London School of Economics and Political Science, touching on the intersection of journalism and society.

New Media

It’s hard to ignore the dominance of the web and other forms of new media in reporting today, so don’t. Instead, learn more about how to leverage these technologies to get your writing and reporting out there.

  1. Journalism 2.0: Mark Briggs writes and edits this blog that addresses the future of journalism and the growing number of entrepreneurial endeavors that are bringing it into the digital age.
  2. Contentious.com: Amy Graham shares her thoughts on communication in the digital age on this blog.
  3. Mashable: While not journalism-focused, this blog is still a must-read for anyone who wants to be at the cutting edge of social media and digital technology.
  4. Online Journalism Blog: Author of The Online Journalism Handbook Paul Bradshaw, along with the help of several other contributors, writes this blog on the new and sometimes confusing world of online journalism.
  5. MediaShift: This PBS blog offers news and commentary on the digital media revolution.
  6. Richochet: Chrys Wu has a passion for both writing and all things techie, which she blends into great informative articles on online journalism here.
  7. paidContent: Digital content is often where the money’s at these days for journalists who want to make a living. Learn more about this issue on this site, featuring a wide range of internet-focused articles.
  8. Publishing 2.0: Are you evolving with publishing? This blog will help you keep up with the rapidly changing world of new media in journalism.
  9. Reportr.net: Alfred Hermida comments on media, technology, and the impact of both on society (and vice versa) through this blog.
  10. Journerdism:Will Sullivan acts as your guide to mobile news and emerging tech ideas on this blog.
  11. Peter Kafka: Here, Peter Kafka shares insights into the latest digital technologies that will undoubtedly influence the future of journalism and media.
  12. 10,000 Words: Billed as the place where journalism and technology meet, this blog lives up to that, offering news on the latest web projects from media outlets around the nation.
  13. Media Lab: MediaShift and the Knight Foundation collaborate to write this blog on reporting, writing, and newspaper publishing in the digital age.
  14. Advancing the Story: Learn how the digital age is impacting broadcast journalism when you read this blog.
  15. CyberJournalist.net: Follow the latest and greatest news on how journalists are using the web and new technology to share information.
  16. @PatrickThornton: Technologist and journalist Patrick Thornton shares his thoughts on the future of journalism here.
  17. Interactive Narratives: This fascinating blog shows just what can be done to enhance a story when digital media are used.
  18. MediaFile: This Reuters blog reports on all things media, with a special focus on digital media.
  19. The Richard Jones Journalism Blog: Digital journalism is the focus on this journalist’s blog, with loads of updates and examples from around the world.
  20. Below the Fold: Digital communications strategist Gary Goldhammer is a great resource for learning about media in the digital age.

Journalists

Who better to learn about journalism from than those who do it for a living? These blogs are all written by professionals in the field, offering insights into what they do, feel, and think on a daily basis.

  1. Howard Owens: Howard Owens has been in the news business for a long time, and in the digital media business longer than most. Check out this blog to learn more his experiences, politics, and other topics.
  2. Ryan Sholin: Explore the future of news with former journalist and current product manager Ryan Sholin.
  3. Abbey Anne’s Blog: Fresh out of college, this young journalist shares her travels, experiences, and more though her (somewhat hard to read) blog.
  4. DigiDave: David Cohn has written for a number of leading publications, but some of his most passionate pieces are found right here, focusing on the intersection between media and technology.
  5. Kelly Roche: Videographer and journalist Kelly Roche shares a wealth of local news on her blog.
  6. SteveOuting.com: This journalist shares his thoughts on the future of news and media, as well as other topics, on this site.
  7. One Man and His Blog: Adam Tinworth writes about the intersection of journalism, publishing, social media, and technology.
  8. Steve Yelvington: Newspaper journalist and media expert Steve Yelvington shares his thoughts on building better online media for news.
  9. The Linchpen: Greg Linch blogs about journalism, technology, and education on this site.
  10. Martin Stabe: Get a UK-centric look at the world of new media and online journalism from Martin Stabe, a London-based journalist.
  11. MatthewIngram.com: Learn more about media, technology, business, and the web from senior GigaOm wrier Mathew Ingram.
  12. Sean Blanda: Sean Blanda, one of the three co-founders of Technically Media, focuses on digital media, journalism, technology, and other hot topics on this personal blog.
  13. Death Reporting: Reporter and editor Mark Scahver writes about journalism, research, technology, and other relevant topics here.

Photojournalism

Pictures are worth a thousand words, right? Learn more about what goes into creating some of journalism’s most iconic images.

  1. Robb Montgomery:International journalist Robb Montgomery shares his expertise on photography, editing, and digital technology on this blog.
  2. Multimedia Shooter: This blog offers instruction on shooting photos and video that tell a story, as well as reporting on some great job openings.
  3. VideoJournalism: Think about a story visually with a bit of help from this video journalism blog.
  4. SnappedShot: Every day you can glimpse an amazing news image on this photo blog.
  5. Maysun Photographer: Spanish-Portuguese freelance photographer Maysun shares images, essays, and more that can help you learn more about the profession.
  6. Lens Culture Weblog: Explore the impact of visual images through this blog, sharing amazing stories and updates on photojournalists from around the world.
  7. Mastering Multimedia: Multimedia producer Colin Mulvany blogs about photography, videography, and more on this site.

Organizations

Keep in touch with leading media groups and organizations through these blogs.

  1. The Society of Professional Journalists Blog Network: Head to this site to read blogs from a range of professional journalists and writers.
  2. Freepress: This organization is dedicated to reforming media and ensuring democracy in the U.S.
  3. OPA Blog: The Online Publishers Association blog is a great place to read more about digital journalism.
  4. Editors Weblog: The World Editors Forum maintains this blog, full of interesting news stories on journalism, digital media, and more.
  5. Reporters Committee: Supporting freedom of the press, this organization reports on major cases around the nation where that freedom has been challenged.

Politics and Criticism

These blogs take a hard look at journalism and the way it interacts with politics.

  1. Adrian Monck: Blogger and broadcast journalist Adrian Monck works at the World Economic Forum these days, and uses his blog to highlight major problems he sees both with media and in world economics.
  2. Reflections of a Newsosaur: Veteran media executive Alan Mutter shares his perspective on where news-gathering companies are headed on this blog.
  3. Jon Slattery: U.K.-based freelance journalist Jon Slattery uses his blog as a platform for sharing media criticism from a British perspective.
  4. Save the Media: Journalist Gina Chen shares ideas and commentary on the dying news industry.
  5. PR Watch: The Center for Media and Democracy based in Wisconsin shares updates on the media in politics and controversial issues here.
  6. On the Media: Readers will find a wealth of commentary on all forms of media on this blog.
  7. Breitbart Big Journalism: One of several blogs on this site, this blog touches on political topics in journalism.
  8. Rhetorica: On Rhetorica, readers will find thoughtful commentary on the intersection between politics and journalism.
  9. County Fair: This Media Matters for America blog reports news and media criticism for readers.
  10. Neiman Watchdog Blog: This blog encourages reporters to ask questions and get straight answers on the tough issues.

Investigative Journalism

These blogs show the importance and difficulty that comes along with investigative journalism.

  1. Center for Investigative Reporting: This blog shares investigative reporting stories from around the world, which makes for some pretty inspiring reading.
  2. AnalyticJournalism.com: Learn tips and tools for getting your story straight (and coming up with a good story to start with) on this crime-focused blog.
  3. The Scoop: Get the scoop on investigative and computer-assisted reporting from Derek Willis here.

Fun

Need a few laughs? These blogs offer it up.

  1. Overheard in the Newsroom: This blog catalogs some of the ridiculous and funny things that are said in newsrooms.
  2. Stuff Journalists Like: Entertaining and interesting, this blog pokes fun at and highlights stuff that journalists will undoubtedly agree is pretty cool.

Citizen Journalism

You don’t need a journalism degree to report the news these days. Learn more about citizen journalists from these blogs.

  1. The Editorialiste: Blogger Andrew Nusca shares his thoughts on the citizen journalist phenomenon here.
  2. Independent Media Center:Learn more about independent media outlets and the news they report on this blog.
  3. The NewsMeBack Blog: This citizen journalism blog shares great books, interviews, articles, and more.
  4. The Citizen Journalist’s Coach:Susan Carson Cormier is a founder of the National Association of Citizen Journalists and a coach, offering advice and guidance for anyone interested in citizen journalism.
SOURCE
Image courtesy

Talk English by colors

 

WHITE

 

 White_Flag
a white lie a harmless lie/ a lie to spare someone’s feelings
white noise static noise
white as a sheet scared, sick, surprised
white as a ghost scared
white-collar related to “desk jobs”
a white flag surrender
to whitewash something to mask the negative parts
white wine wine from green or yellow grapes
a white Christmas snow on Christmas day
a white wedding a traditional western-style wedding where the bride wears a white gown
a white person a person of Caucasian race
white-hot extremely hot OR popular
a white paper an authoritative report on a issue
a white elephant a useless knick-knack OR an expensive, useless thing
white as the driven snow innocent (often used sarcastically about corruption)
white with rage extremely enraged
to bleed someone white to take everything someone has, esp. money
showing the white feather acting cowardly
a white-knuckle ride a dangerous, nerve-wracking, scary ride
that’s mighty white of you (old-fashioned) that’s good of you
lily-white unmistakably Caucasian OR blameless, goodly
white horses (surfing) patches of white foam made by breaking waves
white trash (American) (offensive) uneducated, socio-economically disadvantaged Caucasian people
whiter than white (British) righteous, innocent

BLACK

a white pointer (Australian)

080766-glossy-black-icon-business-envelope1a topless female sunbather
to blackmail someone to threaten to reveal secrets unless payment is made
to black out to lose consciousness
a blackout a loss of electricity in an area
the blackout during wartime, extinguishing or covering lights
black magic / the black arts magic used for malevolent purposes
the pot calling the kettle black someone criticizing someone else for a quality they themselves possess
the black market illegal/underground sales and purchases
little black book book of contacts, esp. past or potential dates
a black sheep the outcast or disgrace in a group
black gold oil / petrolium
  black tie formal clothing e.g. a tuxedo
black humor jokes about death or illness
a black day a day when something bad happens
to be in black and white to be written down officially
to be black and white (a situation) to be clear
in the black profitable
a black mood a bad, grumpy mood
a black eye a bruised eye
to blacklist someone to prevent someone from being hired
to blackball someone to shut someone out from group participation
black and blue bruised
a black look an angry/disapproving facial expression
as black as night very dark black
pitch black very dark black
a black person a person of African heritage
black ops extralegal covert activity, done in the dark (military/politics)
black-hearted cruel, evil, mean
a black mark an indication of wrongdoing
to blacken someone’s name to suggest/indicate a person’s wrongdoing
the Black Death The Bubonic Plague
  a black rat (British) a traffic police officer
Black Friday (U.S.) The day after American Thanksgiving when many stores have sales
the black dog (Irish) a bad mood
beyond the black stump (Australian) the back of nowhere, far from anything

RED

 

 

 

 

 

in the red

arrow-pointing-downunprofitable OR negative financial balance, owing money
a redhead a person with orange-colored hair
red light district area with prostitutes
to see red to be furious
red with rage furious
to turn/go red become embarrassed
a red herring a false clue
to paint the town red to dine, dance, experience fun in a town or city
a red flag a signal that something is wrong
roll out the red carpet give a big welcome
red tape unnecessary/excessive bureaucracy
not one red cent no money at all
a red letter day a special day
a scarlet woman a sinful woman
scarlet fever an infection with group A streptococcus bacteria.
red-hot very hot OR very popular
red card a sanction for a soccer player
red alert a serious warning of danger
a red-blooded male a virile, manly male person
like a red rag/flag to a bull provoking/aggravating anger
red (adjective) communist
bleed red ink (British) debt
red in tooth and claw (British) the wild, violent aspect of the natural world
redshirting (U.S.) delaying an athlete’s participation in sports order to lengthen his/her period of eligibility
  a red state (U.S.) a state whose residents are politically more Republican
a redneck (U.S.) an uneducated, rural white American
a red-bone (U.S.) a light-skinned black woman
the red scare (U.S.) (historical) the worry that society would be infiltrated by communists and communism
the red eye (U.S.) the overnight flight between west and east coast

GREEN

green with envy

green-parrot-wide-300x187very envious
the green-eyed monster jealousy
to give the green light to give approval to proceed
to be green (in a position) to be inexperienced, a rookie
to be green (policy) to be environmentally aware
the green room room in a theater or studio where guests/performers wait to go on
to turn green to be nauseous
green around the gills sick-looking
a greenbelt an area of nature around a city
greens vegetables
a green a golf course
a greengrocer a person/store that sells vegetables & fruit
  the grass is always greener on the other side other people’s possessions/situations always seem better than your own
greener pastures a better situation
to greenwash something to deceptively make practices/policies seem more environmentally friendly
little green men stereotypical/humorous description of space aliens
as sure as God made little green apples very certain
colorless green ideas sleep furiously (Linguistics) Noam Chomsky’s oft-quoted example of a sentence with good grammar but no meaning
to have green fingers (British) to be good with plants/gardens
to have a green thumb (U.S.) to be good with plants/gardens
a greenie (Australian) an environmentally aware person
a green card (U.S.) legal residency status
a greenhorn (U.S.) an inexperienced or young person
greenbacks (U.S.) dollars

YELLOW

yellow

fashion_recap__yellowcowardly
a yellow streak cowardice
yellow-bellied cowardly
yellow journalism disreputable, sensationalistic journalism
a yellow card (soccer) to give someone a first warning
the yellow peril (offensive, archaic) the fear that Asian people will outnumber/displace Caucasian people
yellow fever  an acute viral haemorrhagic disease
yellow fever (Nigerian slang) traffic police
a yellow dog Democrat (U.S.) a voter who always votes Democrat in every election

BLUE

out of the blue

blue-sky-14366suddenly, unexpectedly
a bolt from the blue a sudden/unexpected thing
to be blue to be sad
a blue funk a feeling of melancholy
the blues sadness OR a 3 chord style of music
once in a blue moon infrequently
blue-collar related to manual labor or the working class
a blue blood an aristocratic person
to talk a blue streak to talk a lot
to turn blue to have difficulty breathing
blue with cold feeling very cold
until you’re blue in the face having lost your patience
blue chip stock stock of an established/financially sound company
working blue performing using foul language
a blue movie a pornographic film
a blueprint (for something) a design, a guide
true blue faithful
blue on blue in military: friendly fire
into the wide/wild blue yonder to an unknown/faraway place
blue balls (lewd) male sexual frustration due to unfulfilled sexual urges
to turn the air blue to swear a lot
between the devil and the deep blue sea a dilemma
the boys in blue the police
the thin blue line the police
a blue state (U.S.) a state whose residents are politically more Democrat
a blue (British) a Tory
to scream blue murder (British) to express yourself angrily
a blue-eyed boy (British) a male who can do no wrong, who is favored by authority
having a blue (Australian) having a fight
make a blue (Australian) make a mistake

BROWN

a brown-noser

51FWx8gxbOL._SY300_a sycophant
in a brown study being contemplative; daydreaming
  browned off (British) annoyed

PURPLE

purple prose

purpleflowery, romantic writing
born in the purple born into a high ranking/aristocratic family
the Purple Heart (U.S.) a U.S. military honor badge
a purple patch (British) a period of exceptionally high achievement

ORANGE

agent orange

Orange_and_cross_sectiona defoliant used in herbicidal warfare
Orangemen (Irish) Protestant fraternal organization

PINK

in the pink of health

big_a149_pinko_rozovata_panteravery healthy
tickled pink very pleased
a pinko a communist
to see the world through rose-colored glasses to see the world through an optimistic filter
rosy positive, optimistic,
to get a pink slip to be fired
the pink pound (British) consumer spending by gay people

GREY

grey area

seagull_greyunclear
grey matter the brain
to give someone grey hairs to try someone’s patience
gray market sale of products via nonstandard distribution channels or at an unofficial price
grey nomads (Australian) retirees who travel around the country
the silver screen the movies

GOLDEN

a golden boy

Gold bar isolated with clipping patha well-regarded, successful man
a golden handshake monetary incentive to join a company
a golden parachute money given to an executive leaving a company
golden ears great listening ability to discern quality or commerciality
a golden shower (lewd) urinating on a sexual partner
a golden mean the desirable middle (between extremes of excess and deficiency)

COLOR

off-color

rainbow_fridge_magnetinappropriate, crude
to show your true colors to reveal your true self or feelings
a colorless person a boring person
colorful (e.g. tale, history, life) event-filled and interesting
colorful language vivid or expletive-filled language
to pass with flying colors to do very well
local color having typical characteristics of the local area
color commentary facts & comments about athletes during a broadcast
a horse of a different color a completely different thing/idea
a country’s colors the colors of a national flag
 SOURCE

Contronyms: What did you mean by deceptively smart?

A synonym is a word that means the same as another.

Necessary and required are synonyms.

https://i2.wp.com/mrgray.id.au/wp-content/uploads/2009/04/a_synonym_tshirt.jpg

An antonym is a word that means the opposite of another.

Wet and dry are antonyms.

While synonyms and antonyms are not in themselves interesting, the complexities and irregularities of the English language sometimes make synonyms and antonyms interesting to explore. Many complexities result from words having multiple definitions.

A trivial example is a word with synonyms that aren’t synonyms of each other, the word beam, for example, having the synonyms bar and shine.

Similarly, some words have antonyms that are neither synonyms nor antonyms of each other but completely unrelated: the word right, for example, having the antonyms wrong and left.

A more interesting paradox occurs with the word groom, which does not really have an antonym in the strictest sense but has an opposite of sorts in the word bride, which can be used as a prefix to create a synonym, bridegroom.

https://i0.wp.com/www.bohobride.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/groom01.jpg

The word contronym (also antagonym) is used to refer to words that, by some freak of language evolution, are their own antonyms. Read More…

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