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What type of geek are you?

I am a weirdo of some kind, I come to believe. But what kind of weirdo that might be? I am introverted, I like reading books, but I also am a blogger and a vlogger, I follow the dress code and the social norms but I do not especially enjoy them completely. 

Am I

a geek? A nerd? A dork? What is the difference?

56 geeks chart

 

56 Geeks 291231258_nerds_need_manuels_love_too_xlarge geek-nerdSM Nerd_Dork_Geek_Dweeb

Did you find yourself in the charts? Or could you invent a word for the kind of geek you (think) you are?

 

Sources:

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English humour

— Will you tell me your name?
— Will Knot.
— Why not?

— What do ghosts serve for dessert?
— Ice Scream.

— Who won the skeleton beauty contest?
— No body.

A policeman pulled over a speeding motorist and asked,”Do you have any ID?” The motorist replied, “About what?”

There are three ways a man wears his hair – parted, unparted and departed.

I like your approach…Let’s see your departure.

If I could rearrange the alphabet I would put U and I together!

Don’t steal, the Government hates competition!

Effective communication is “BRIEF”

We send and receive dozens of e-mails and have tens of conversations daily. More often than not one needs to read an e-mail thoroughly several times before understanding the actions needed or despite carefully listening the ramble of someone misses the point of the conversation.

“43% of people who received long-winded emails deleted or ignored them.”

Be more effective in your communication by following the BRIEF rule.

Fast Company have created the following formula for better communicating your information and/or needs:

B (Background): Provide a quick context—what happened beforehand?

R (Reason): Explain why you’re contacting them now— why should they engage?

I (Information): Give two to three pieces of information. What are the three main points or bullets of the topic?

E (End): Decide what do you want to be remembered. Tell the next steps – you will do what OR you expect the other site to do what.

F (Follow-up): Try to predict the questions asked at the end of conversation or (as a reply to the message) and prepare answers in advance.

Read why less is more HERE.

How to become good at peer review: A guide for young scientists

This week I need to submit two peer-reviews for my university assignment. In doing so, I needed some guidance to make it better and I found this excellent article. Hope it helps you, too.

Violent metaphors

Peer review is at the heart of the scientific method. Its philosophy is based on the idea that one’s research must survive the scrutiny of experts before it is presented to the larger scientific community as worthy of serious consideration. Reviewers (also known as referees) are experts in a particular topic or field. They have the requisite experience and knowledge to evaluate whether a study’s methods are appropriate, results are accurate, and the authors’ interpretations of the results are reasonable. Referees are expected to alert the journal editor to any problems they identify, and make recommendations as to whether a paper should be accepted, returned to the authors for revisions, or rejected. Referees are not expected to replicate results or (necessarily) to be able to identify deliberate fraud. While it’s by no means a perfect system (see, for example, the rising rates of paper retractions), it is still the…

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The Politically Incorrect Etymologies of 10 Words and Phrases

At various moments in its life, a word will hop languages, change meanings, travel through sinister moments and land in pleasant ones. But no matter how many times it’s superimposed, and how far it gets from its original source, a word doesn’t let go of its memories easily. Here are 11 modern English words with socially insensitive origins.

 

hysteria meaning

1. Hysteria (n.) – a wild, irrational eruption of fear or emotion

Hysteria begins in the womb, or so thought the medical scholars of the 1610s, who named the condition after the Latin hystericus, meaning “of the womb.” Those who’ve studied the Victorian era, or read The Awakening in high school, may know that the go-to prognosis of the time for just about every female’s symptom from the occasional hissy fit to chronic seizures was a pesky wayfaring uterus. The condition was thought to be caused by sexual frustration and cured by intercourse or pelvic massage, the latter often performed by physicians and midwives. When doctors finally got fed up with the tedious task in the late 19th century, the personal vibrator was created to take their place. Read More…

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