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Tag Archive | difference

Convince or persuade?

Understand that some experts say that “persuade” and “convince” are synonyms that go back at least to the sixteenth century. The meanings are so closely knit that often one word serves as well as the other.

Grammar

After ‘persuade’ we use the structure
to + infinitive:

  • I persuaded them to stay for another drink.
  • He persuaded her not to take the job.

After ‘convince’ we cannot use a verb infinitive. We say ‘convince someone that‘:

  • She convinced the police that she was telling the truth.
  • He convinced her that it was the right thing to do.

Both of the above sentence would also be correct without ‘that’:

  • She convinced the police she was telling the truth.
  • He convinced herit was the right thing to do.

 

Meaning

Convince yourself to get these words right. Persuasion is a process. A hoped-for result is to convince.
There can also be a subtle difference in meaning between ‘convince’ and ‘persuade’, as seen here:

Although Robert finally persuaded his girlfriend to move abroad with him, she was not fully convinced that it was the best thing to do.

In the example, Robert’s girlfriend was persuaded (to move) but was not convinced (that it was the correct decision). So, we can see that when we persuade someone to do something it doesn’t always mean that we have also convinced that person.

The teenager is convinced she can win. The boy was persuaded to run the 10-yard dash.
Convinced” is for changing mental beliefs. Persuasion is change of belief followed by action.

One more thing is worth mentioning about ‘persuade’ and ‘convince’. If we are absolutely sure about something, we say I’m convinced:

– Are you sure he’s innocent?
– Yes, I’m convinced.
NOT I’m persuaded

Additional info

Some related words:
convincing (adjective)  It was a convincing argument.
persuasive (adjective) Marta can be very persuasive when she wants.
persuasion (noun) He used his powers of persuasion.

 

When confronted with issues of word choice, I often find it helpful to consider the associations and connotations a word has in its different forms. A convincing person or argument is one that other people cannot help but agree with, whereas a persuasive person or argument is one that other people find compelling, but which leaves more room (in my mind) for the opportunity to disagree.

If you have been convinced, you have clearly and decisively changed your perspective. If you have been persuaded, then you have chosen to agree with those you previously disagreed with. In the latter case, it may not be so much that you’ve found an argument you agree with so much as you’re indulging someone who has appealed to you, either positively or negatively.

Prefer “convince” when the change of opinion must be definite or to deemphasize the role of whomever did the convincing. Prefer “persuade” to draw attention to either the arguments used or the individuals doing the arguing, to emphasize reluctance on the part of the persuaded, or when you need the word to contain more vowels.

 

Resources:

Photocredit: http://persuasionuvm.blogspot.com
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Co-worker vs. colleague

What is the difference?

Co-workers are all of those people you work with. Some are on the same level as you, some higher, some lower. You all work at the same place though so you are co-workers.

Colleagues are those people that are your occupational peers (equal level of position and responsibility). Two high school teachers at the same school are coworkers and colleagues. The principal is also their coworker but not their colleague. The principals colleagues are other school principals.

The dictionary tells us that colleagues share class or profession whereas coworkers simply “works with another…”

Via Yahoo answers

A little bit but now you know it,

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