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Tag Archive | Review

10 Places to Ignore Your Grammar and Spelling Checker

Written by Lynn Gaertner-Johnston, Syntax Training

Because grammar and spelling checkers are software programs, they can’t read your mind or know your intentions. They also frequently cannot distinguish between correct and incorrect sentence structures and the use of words that sometimes confuse us humans. Below are 10 places in which your software may be suggesting errors rather than correcting them.

 
1. When you use your reader’s name in a sentence. Grammar and spelling checkers may not recognize whether you are talking to or about the person. These sentences are correct, but my grammar and spelling checker flagged them anyway.
Eric, thanks for writing this article. [The comma after Eric’s name is correct because we are addressing him directly.]
Dave, in the employee version, add an example here. [My checker suggested changing add to adds–wrong!]
Lynn, may we have permission to print your material? [It suggested that I capitalize may as a month, which is incorrect, of course!]
2. When you begin a sentence with an introductory clause. Your grammar and spelling checker does not recognize where you intend the clause to end. In the first indented sentence below, for example, it may suggest a comma after write, Mark, or program. Just remember to use a comma before the main part of the sentence, as the sentences below do. They are punctuated correctly, although my grammar and spelling checker suggested additional commas.
When you write to Mark about the program in Kansas City, be sure he understands that it is in Missouri.
         If they do give you a copy of the receipt, keep it for your records.

If you want to help employees improve their writing, use this guide.

3. When your software suggests changing a verb from singular to plural or vice versa (by adding s, removing s, or changing from is to are, for example). Your grammar and spelling checker may frequently suggest new errors in subject-verb agreement. The three sentences below are correct, but my grammar and spelling checker suggested changing them.
Any files beginning with 000 need to be moved to the C drive. [Need is correct–not needs.]
Thank you for letting us know about your shopping experience. [Know is correct–not knows!]

The average number of words per sentence is 15 to 20. [The verb is is correct; are would be wrong.]

Read More…

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Practice makes perfect

For those of you who have read the “Outliersby Michael Gladwell and/or my 30-second review on it, here is a marvellous infographic that shows what exactly 10,000 hours of practice look like.

Enjoy 🙂

I read and review – Outliers by Michael Gladwell

Today is the launch of my new column I read and review where I will be giving you my 30sec. opinion on my last readings.

Your feedback on contents of the review and its visual formatting is important and what is more, interesting to me, so please, feel free and encouraged to share it in the comments below. 🙂

Without further due, my first guest, Michael Gladwell:

(click to enlarge)

Want to receive more of my book reviews? Please subscribe in one (two) easy step(s) 🙂

What is wrong with John Grisham…?

…or is it just me?

I am giving him a second chance to impress me and captivate me in a similar way The Hunger Games series, to entertain me like Douglas Adams’es or P.G.Wodehouse’s works, to teach me things about myself like Ray Bradbury, to enrich my vocabulary like J.K.Rowling did or… to do anything to withhold me from regretting I lost precious hours of my life trying to find why is he so famous of his writings.

It does not work as he does nothing for me. I am somehow not buying the style, the whole package – the “insight” in the world of law, lawyers, solicitors, attorneys, barristers, judges and who-not-among-them; the cheesy American dream, the working 80 hours a week rookie that will eventually become a partner and on his way to the top will meet vile-tempered people but will fight them with his impeccable moral code and will always remain the good boy, the hero who will leave the scene and begin a brand new lawyer’s life in some other firm (already waiting for him). Mhm. Too everything-is-on-the-surface. Too over-the top.

My first John Grisham novel was “The Associate”. A true bore. Back in my senior year at the university I had to translate it for one of my exams. It took me good three months of struggle and I got the feeling some nevrons might have died in the battle.

I hated all Grisham-related talks ever since up until very recently when I decided to give him a second chance. This time with “The Firm”. 25% now (Kiki-reading) and nothing thrilling happened. Yes, the guy met with an FBI agent. So what? I am pondering over should I lose time for the next  75% or I should call it a day (in this case a novel) and go back to the readings I enjoy…?

What is your Grisham experience?

Have I taken a wrong turn or is he just the male version of the chick-lit without its humour and lightheartedness?

Still wondering is it him or is it me,

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