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Tag Archive | book

The ultimate question: Am I really a writer?

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Character Feelings

You can describe your character’s feelings in more exact terms than just “happy” or “sad.” Check these lists for the exact nuance to describe your character’s intensity of feelings.

Intensity of
Feelings
HAPPY SAD ANGRY CONFUSED
High Elated
Excited
Overjoyed
Thrilled
Exuberant
Ecstatic
Fired up
Delighted
Depressed
Disappointed
Alone
Hurt
Left out
Dejected
Hopeless
Sorrowful
Crushed
Furious
Enraged
Outraged
Aggrivated
Irate
Seething
Bewildered
Trapped
Troubled
Desperate
Lost
Medium Cheerful
Up
Good
Relieved
Satisfied
Contented
Heartbroken
Down
Upset
Distressed
Regret
Upset
Mad
Annoyed
Frustrated
Agitated
Hot
Disgusted
Disorganized
Foggy
Misplaced
Disoriented
Mixed up
Mild Glad
Content
Satisfied
Pleasant
Fine
Mellow
Pleased
Unhappy
Moody
Blue
Sorry
Lost
Bad
Dissatisfied
Perturbed
Uptight
Dismayed
Put out
Irritated
Touchy
Unsure
Puzzled
Bothered
Uncomfortable
Undecided
Baffled
Perplexed
Intensity of
Feelings
AFRAID WEAK STRONG GUILTY
High Terrified
Horrified
Scared stiff
Petrified
Fearful
Panicky
Helpless
Hopeless
Beat
Overwhelmed
Impotent
Small
Exhausted
Drained
Powerful
Aggressive
Gung ho
Potent
Super
Forceful
Proud
Determined
Sorrowful
Remorseful
Ashamed
Unworthy
Worthless
Medium Scared
Frightened
Threatened
Insecure
Uneasy
Shocked
Dependent
Incapable
Lifeless
Tired
Rundown
Lazy
Insecure
Shy
Energetic
Capable
Confident
Persuasive
Sure
Sorry
Lowdown
Sneaky
Mild Apprehensive
Nervous
Worried
Timid
Unsure
Anxious
Unsatisfied
Under par
Shaky
Unsure
Soft
Lethargic
Inadequate
Secure
Durable
Adequate
Able
Capable
Embarrassed

Via http://www.sff.net

I read and review – Outliers by Michael Gladwell

Today is the launch of my new column I read and review where I will be giving you my 30sec. opinion on my last readings.

Your feedback on contents of the review and its visual formatting is important and what is more, interesting to me, so please, feel free and encouraged to share it in the comments below. 🙂

Without further due, my first guest, Michael Gladwell:

(click to enlarge)

Want to receive more of my book reviews? Please subscribe in one (two) easy step(s) 🙂

The Smell of Books

Discussing the e-readers and their lack of the craved smell of books… freshly-pressed-books-smell junkies, here it comes:

The rumor started last year: Chanel guru Karl Lagerfeld was believed to develop a new fragance in cooperation with other book lovers. Apparently the designer has a love for books, besides his love for fashion. His own tremendous bookshelves inspired Karl to actually develop the fragrance, which is – surprisingly – named Paper Passion.

What do we smell? Easy: the smell of fresh printed books. “The best smell in the world”, according to Karl.

Photo’s via: Rts

Via http://www.womens9.com

Geroff Kindle!

And by Kindle, I mean all types of e-readers.

And by geroff I mean, for authors’ sake, just let it be.

Every week I pick up a handful of posts by some moaning, whining and pouring buckets of anger bloggers who despise the very existence or even the idea of an electronic book. Cry me a river, then. Ok.

No, wait. What?! Come again? Are you serious? You are mad, because… let me think. Because someone is in love with the contents of a book, not with its binding, smell of glue, or of vanillin paper, or with the sound of rustling pages. Really?  Is this the reason you buy books for? Kind of fetish? It’s fine by me. But.

I don’t like reading on computer or phone because it strains my eyes. I don’t like reading on a tablet either, for the very same reason. Yet I don’t write despicable posts to tell the world how I die to ban reading on anything but a soft off-white paper with 11pt Georgia font. I just don’t use what does not seem to suit me well. I also happen to dislike gumbo but I don’t deny your right to have some once in a while.

Now you let the people who actually care about worlds of words and heroes have it their way and that is whichever the way possible. Computer, e-reader, tissue paper, wall, sand, stone…never mind.  Why? Because it does not matter what you think of the medium/device/bearer of the information. It’s the story that’s important. And certainly not your personal taste.

No fancy binding could divert me of satisfy my needs for READING.

Now have it your way, or other way but do not become a paper book-nazi. We have had enough.

 

I don’t care that much about the form,

Five Ways to Break Through Writers Block

Bottom line is there are two types of writers: those who believe in writers block and those who don’t. Neither will deny the magic and energy that possesses an author when inspiration rears its mysterious head, but where their approach to writing differs is how the time is spent between those moments of inspiration.

Picture a blank page and what do you see? A canvas waiting to be filled with your words and your voice? Or a taunting emptiness that has you despairing over your first line?

When you are daunted by the incessant cursor winking at you from the shoreless white sea on your computer, one of the biggest mistakes a writer can make is succumbing to doubt.

Here are five practical tips that will snap you out of your daze and dissolve your writers block so that you can get back to the book you’re dying to write.

1) Just write!

Remember that nothing is perfect the first go-around, and if you let a blank sheet of paper intimidate you, you’re doomed from the beginning.

A book doesn’t write itself after all.

Take a walk and clear you head. Put on some music and brew some coffee. Then crack your knuckles, sit down in front of your computer and type out ideas, images – whatever pops into your head. Perhaps transcribe a dialogue between two friends, or something you overheard in line at the grocery store; before you know it, you’ll have painted an entire scene.

Maybe the language and tone aren’t your best ever, maybe the flow is all wrong and a section or two jumps into a completely different dimension, but now you have something real, something to work with and mold to your liking.

Even if out of an hour’s worth of work you keep only two or three sentences, you now have direction.

At the very least you now know what to avoid the next time you write.

2) Make an outline

Think about the beginning, middle and end of your project. Where are you starting, where are you headed and where would you like to end?

Jot down general ideas and details you plan to mention. Find a rhythm and progression to the entire project.

Reestablish your authority and realize that you can speak confidently on the subject you’ve chosen.

Once you have your bearings and a firm grip on your subject, you’ll move ahead with greater clarity and less stress.

3) Exercise

Writing exercises are another great way of dodging writers block. Sometimes all a writer needs is a little push in the right direction, and exercises can be just the ticket.

In addition to sharpening your writing skills and developing your own voice, exercises also get your creative juices flowing.

Take a few minutes, step away from the project that has you sweating, and write something for fun. These exercises can range anywhere from using a word randomly selected to detailing the dream you had the previous evening to the quirky how-did-this-green-umbrella-get-in-this-room explanations.

Long story short, you can’t write if you’re not enjoying yourself. Remember the reason you’re writing at all. Exercises can help you laugh, learn and realize your passion for writing all over again.

4) Practice makes perfect

Inspiration comes in spurts, but, like sleeping, you can regulate your cycle.

Set aside a specific hour or two each day devoted strictly to writing. Say you prefer writing in the morning. Then wake up an hour early, brew some coffee, and pull a chair up to your computer.

Before the end of the week, you’ll have a writing schedule ingrained in your daily routine, and you’ll discover that your creative groove makes its appearance at the time you’ve established.

5) Who’s listening?

Don’t forget that you’re writing for an audience – one that targets your writing for its authority and knowledge on a given subject.

Like you, your audience wants the whole story. They want the facts and scenes delivered to them without hesitation, without vagueness, but most importantly, without dilly-dallying. The last thing your audience wants is to be bored.

Writers block can be a good indication that you’re simply bored with what you’ve written, and you can safely deduce that your audience will be as well when they open your future book.

Go back and read what you’ve written. Where did the energy fizzle out and the tone take a nosedive? What was the most interesting part and what made it so invigorated? Your readers are smart people, not unlike yourself, and the flaws as well as the virtues you notice in your own writing will be the same ones your audience sees as well.

Some authors envision a single person to whom they are telling their story in order to give their audience a face, a listening ear and a doubtful expression.

For example, Kurt Vonnegut pictured himself writing to his sister when he started a book. For him, she acted as the devil’s advocate, frowning when a sentence sounded sour, laughing when a scene tickled her.

Don’t get bogged down by the incomprehensible size of your audience. Take a page from the Vonnegut book on writing and picture a friend, a family member, anyone you trust, and let them be your guide!

 
Via Wordclay Writing Help Center

What is wrong with John Grisham…?

…or is it just me?

I am giving him a second chance to impress me and captivate me in a similar way The Hunger Games series, to entertain me like Douglas Adams’es or P.G.Wodehouse’s works, to teach me things about myself like Ray Bradbury, to enrich my vocabulary like J.K.Rowling did or… to do anything to withhold me from regretting I lost precious hours of my life trying to find why is he so famous of his writings.

It does not work as he does nothing for me. I am somehow not buying the style, the whole package – the “insight” in the world of law, lawyers, solicitors, attorneys, barristers, judges and who-not-among-them; the cheesy American dream, the working 80 hours a week rookie that will eventually become a partner and on his way to the top will meet vile-tempered people but will fight them with his impeccable moral code and will always remain the good boy, the hero who will leave the scene and begin a brand new lawyer’s life in some other firm (already waiting for him). Mhm. Too everything-is-on-the-surface. Too over-the top.

My first John Grisham novel was “The Associate”. A true bore. Back in my senior year at the university I had to translate it for one of my exams. It took me good three months of struggle and I got the feeling some nevrons might have died in the battle.

I hated all Grisham-related talks ever since up until very recently when I decided to give him a second chance. This time with “The Firm”. 25% now (Kiki-reading) and nothing thrilling happened. Yes, the guy met with an FBI agent. So what? I am pondering over should I lose time for the next  75% or I should call it a day (in this case a novel) and go back to the readings I enjoy…?

What is your Grisham experience?

Have I taken a wrong turn or is he just the male version of the chick-lit without its humour and lightheartedness?

Still wondering is it him or is it me,

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